Chrome warns you if your username or passwords have been hacked

///Chrome warns you if your username or passwords have been hacked

Chrome warns you if your username or passwords have been hacked

Chrome warns you if your username or passwords have been hacked, Google’s Chrome browser can now warn you if you’re using a password that’s been shared online and might be insecure, whenever you log into online services.

Once you’ve installed Chrome’s new Password Checkup extension, a warning message will be displayed if you enter a username and password that have been published online somewhere by hackers – for example, after a major leak on a social media website.

Any checks of your username and password are said to be carried out in real time and are fully encrypted.

Chrome rival Firefox has already been sounding the alarm since the end of 2018 whenever users visit a page that has been hacked or one that has suffered a data leak.

A notification appears informing the user of the time and extent of the attack or leak. Firefox also doesn’t require you to install an extension.

Chrome’s security-focused extension just weeks after what may have been the biggest breach of data since the infamous Yahoo leak in 2013.

A collection of some 770 million email addresses, as well as millions of passwords, were discovered by a security checker and founder of password hack checker Have I Been Pwned.

Hunt, who himself set up the website Have I Been Pwned, revealed his discovery of the 772,904,991 email addresses alongside 21,222,975 passwords, which were dumped on the cloud service MEGA and being circulated by hackers online.


Password Alert helps protect against phishing attacks.

If you enter your Google Account password or Google for Work password into anywhere other than Google’s sign-in page, you’ll receive an alert, so you can quickly change your password if needed. Password Alert also checks each page you visit to see if it’s impersonating Google’s sign-in page, and alerts you if so.

FAQ (Password Alert Chrome Extention FAQ)

— When will Password Alert take effect?

Password Alert will initialize itself the next time you enter your password into myaccount.google.com

— Does Password Alert store my password or keystrokes?

No. Password Alert doesn’t store your password or keystrokes instead, it stores a secure thumbnail of your password, which it compares against a thumbnail of your most recent keystrokes within Chrome.

— Where does Password Alert send data?

If you are using Password Alert in a Google Account, Password Alert does not send any data from your local computer. If your Google for Work administrator chooses to deploy Password Alert across your domain, the administrator will receive alerts when Password Alert triggers.

— What are Password Alert limits?

Password Alert only operates inside the Chrome web browser when Javascript is enabled. Password Alert doesn’t protect Chrome Apps or Chrome Extensions, and it only protect incognito tabs if configured at chrome://extensions. It also does not protect passwords for non-Google services.

— Where can I find more details?

Visit the full FAQ at support.google.com, or you can see the entire open-source codebase at: github.com/google/password-alert. By installing this item, you agree to the Google Terms of Service and Privacy Policy at: https://www.google.com/policies/

By |2019-04-03T16:17:35-04:00April 2nd, 2019|Categories: Tech News|Tags: , , , |

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I am a loving father, & husband. I am a computer enthusiast. I have used and enjoyed computers since I was young and I enjoy teaching young minds how to code, because it teaches them how to think. Today with YouTube, and social media garbage our youth are losing the ability to think on their own and solve problems. I believe this is a serious epidemic as kids today dont understand that technology is a tool. This tool is being abused, and its underlying effects are taking its toll on kids behaviour, and learning.